The Pavilion of Cuba, A Representative Sample of the 1929 Expo in Seville

 

The Expo of 29 left behind many buildings of great historical and architectural value in Seville. One of the most representative is the Cuba Pavilion.
 
The Heliopolis neighbourhood and Avenida de la Palmera, next to its surroundings, were the places chosen to host the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929.
In fact, the Heliopolis neighbourhood is a result of this planning.
 
One of the most characteristic buildings left by the 29th Expo is the Cuba Pavilion. The colonial air that its balconies transmit with dark brown Salomonic or spiral columns are astounding.
 

 

 

 

The Cuba Pavilion was not one of the first buildings in the planning. At the beginning of the century, Spain and Cuba had a tense relationship due to Cuba’s recent independence in 1898. Therefore, when Spain invited Cuba, the Cubans were reluctant to go, but a few years later they confirmed their attendance.
 
The building was designed by Cuban architects Evelio Govantes and Félix Cabarrocas. They shaped the colonial influence in the absence of a typical national architecture. The building is abounding with wooden finishes on its balconies, lanterns, stairs, and elaborate coffered ceilings.

The Pavilion of Cuba is currently in a good state of conservation. Today it is the headquarters of the Andalusian Agency for International Cooperation for Development (not open to the general public). Although it cannot be visited, it is possible to appreciate the building from the Avenue, while enjoying a relaxing walk from our charming hotel in Seville.